Menu Chiudi

Nasce l’UK National Bibliographic Knowledgebase (NBK)

Dopo ben 36 mesi di lavoro e 4 diverse fasi di gara OCLC ha vinto l’assegnazione da parte del JISC dell’incarico per la creazione del NBK (National Bibliographic Knowledgebase)

“The NBK will be a genuine knowledgebase combining information from various sources to tackle the collection management challenges facing UK academic institutions. We are working closely with RLUK, SCONUL, The British Library, individual representatives from academic libraries, publishers, licensing organisations and service providers to try and really think through how to realise transformational change.”

Progetto JiscNBK

JISC (Joint Information Systems Committee) è un’organizzazione senza fini di lucro del Regno Unito il cui ruolo è quello di sostenere l’istruzione superiore e la ricerca, fornendo competenze, risorse digitali, tecnologie e servizi; sviluppare nuove tecnologie e metodi di lavoro. E’ finanziato da vari organi pubblici del Regno unito e da vari istituti di istruzione superiore.

Per maggiori informazioni sul progetto: https://www.oclc.org/en/news/releases/2017/201702sheffield.html

Closing the Gap


closing-gap

Andrew Pace discusses the functional gap that still exists for library operations as they relate to electronic resource management and integrated library systems. Pace
also provides strategies for closing the content providers’ gap in order to fulfil the needs of the end user. Participants in the library information service framework (libraries,
content suppliers, and vendors) need to examine their practices and push through these gaps to evolve solutions for effective electronic resource management and fulfilment.

The Annual Buyers’ Guide Directory 2016
www.buyersguideonline.co.uk

Accedi all’articolo

Library and Archives Canada avvia la sostituzione di AMICUS

2016-11-09_165911

Library and Archives Canada (LAC) is beginning the process of negotiating with the Online Computer Library Centre (OCLC) to develop a cutting edge service to manage acquisitions, cataloguing, access, circulation and resource sharing to replace AMICUS, including the National Union Catalogue (NUC).

Both Amicus and the NUC are of critical importance to the Canadian library system. The current technologies for these were created almost 20 years ago and no longer meet the needs or expectations of Canadians in the 21st century.

After consulting key stakeholders in the Canadian library community, LAC, in its discussions with OCLC, is seeking to provide a service that:

  • is efficient and state-of-the-art;
  • gives Canadians comprehensive access to documentary heritage;
  • values and protects Canadian culture.

Qui l’intera notizia